GENIE


GeoEngineering and Negative Emissions Pathways in Europe

About

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About the GENIE project

The path to climate neutrality needs to explicitly consider the roles of solar geoengineering and negative emissions technologies. A meta-analytical framework where social science, engineering, and physical science disciplines merge is necessary for a comprehensive mapping of this transition. The EU-funded GENIE project will explore the environmental, technical, social, legal, ethical and policy dimensions of greenhouse gas removal and solar radiation management. GENIE aims to produce a comprehensive scientific assessment for evidence-based policymaking to address climate change, and to expand our toolkit for a zero-emissions future.


Geoengineering technologies, such as solar radiation management (SRM), and negative emissions technologies, such as greenhouse gas removal (GGR), are emerging options to address climate change. This project will investigate the environmental, technical, social, legal, and policy dimensions of GGR and SRM. We provide an urgently needed interdisciplinary and holistic perspective of these technologies in order to understand conditions under which they might be deployed at scale. Our meta-analytical framework integrates insights from social science, engineering and physical science disciplines to provide a comprehensive view of GGR and SRM in the transition to climate neutrality in Europe and the world. The project will conduct excellent research and generate a robust, scientific assessment for evidence-based policymaking. Our research framework consists of three pillars—techno-economic systems, socio-technical systems, and systems of political action—within which we place six work packages (WPs). These are: (1) Understanding the current state and future potential of GGR and SRM technologies in terms of their technical and economic features; (2) Analysing bottlenecks in transitions to climate neutrality and their implications for deployment; (3) Identifying social acceptance and legitimacy constraints, (4) Learning, diffusion, and adoption; (5) Implications for Sustainable Development Goals of archetypical mitigation pathways; and 6) Policy options and governance. A crosscutting WP7 synthesizes research along three salient, but under-researched themes: A) Socio-technical change; B) Managing transition risks; and C) Political economy and feasibility of deployment. WP8 focuses on stakeholder engagement, entailing scenario co-design, science-policy dialogue formats, and specific outreach formats for target groups.


Find a project summary of GENIE here.

Who we are

Principal Investigators

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Benjamin Sovacool, Aarhus University and Sussex University

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Keywan Riahi, International Institute on Applied Systems Analysis

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Jan Minx, Mercator Research Institute on Global Commons and Climate Change (MCC)

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Gregory Nemet, University of Wisconsin-Madison

Researchers and associates

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Sean Low, Aarhus University

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Chad Baum, Aarhus University

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Peter Enevoldsen, Aarhus University

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Gerardo Zarazua de Rubens, Aarhus University

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William Lamb, Mercator Research Institute on Global Commons and Climate Change

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Finn Müller-Hansen, Mercator Research Institute on Global Commons and Climate Change

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Sabine Fuss, Mercator Research Institute on Global Commons and Climate Change

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Felix Creutzig, Mercator Research Institute on Global Commons and Climate Change

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Benjamin Mitterrutzner, International Institute on Applied Systems Analysis

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Shonali Pachauri, International Institute on Applied Systems Analysis

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Bas van Ruijven, International Institute on Applied Systems Analysis

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Jan Steinhauser, International Institute on Applied Systems Analysis

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Michael Obersteiner, International Institute on Applied Systems Analysis

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Volker Krey, International Institute on Applied Systems Analysis

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Cameron Roberts, University of Wisconsin-Madison

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Jenna Greene, University of Wisconsin-Madison

Contact us

If you would like to know more about the activities of the group, or if you would like to find out more about how to get involved please email us.

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This project has received funding from the European Research Council (ERC) under the European Union’s Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme (grant agreement No 951542)


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